Hidden Interculturality in the Company: the Negotiation Between Different Professional Cultures

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

Example of Recognition and Modulation of Sub-Languages ​​in a Sales Negotiation.

Each administrative communication session can be destroyed by the use of dysfunctional styles and jargons, words, and inappropriate attitudes. In the case we present below, we can see how two corporate cultures can collide when one (or both) don’t care 1 – to take into account the comprehensibility of one’s own language, of the terms used, to explain the terms that allow understanding of the speech (terminological metacommunication capacity); 2 – of the precision of the language.

How communication style choices increase negotiation distances In a business meeting between an IT company and a mechanical company, the conductor (owner of the IT company) mainly uses two repertoires and related communication strategies:

  • the use of a dense repertoire of English-speaking terminologies even where it is not necessary (Anglophone managerialese);
  • the dressing of terminologies with phrases that obscure the meaning and create connotative penumbra (smoky meanings), with the function of “softening” the image and workload that the adoption of the program provides (diminutive style).

Tab. 3 – Elements of repertoire, managerialese-diminutive style (A)

Repertoire used for the “Anglophone managerialese” componentRepertoire for the “diminutive style”
1 – Make a forecast
2 – He is a staff user
3 – I have seen the account
4 – Get the Function Description
5 – If you want to contact the trader
6 – We need to address the target setter
7 – You want to do a tracking
8 – If it overdues
9 – We have a visit
10 – We must give a reason
11 – We work on the field
12 – Make a pricing
13 – I take a sales call
14 – At the front end
15 – To the backend
16 – I do the query
17 – It is an activity report
18 – Take a survey
19 – A little more friendly
20 – The Repository
21 – To activate the click-stream analysis you need the BW
1 – It seems to me that they are satisfied customers
2 – We need to think about it for a moment
3 – Let’s take a very quick tour
4 – The version for the handheld
5 – A little like on the internet
6 – A small graph
7 – We are seeing a little concrete application
8 – Let’s see if it’s possible for a moment
9 – Let’s do a little check then let’s see
10 – I think it can be done

In four hours of meeting, we can witness the Collision of conversational states, in which a team (sales team) uses repertoire A (“diminutive English-speaking computer managerial”), while the purchasing team uses a repertoire similar to the following:

Tab. 4 – Elements of the pragmatic-concrete style

Terminological repertory (words)Pragmatic questions
1 – The market
2- Customers
3 – Internal staff
4 – The workload
5 – Ease of learning
6 – Integration with existing programs
7 – Hours
8 – Days
9 – Cost of licenses
10 – Limitations of use
11 – Skills  
1 – On this project, who does what in our company and who does what in your company?
2 – Can we use the program we are down using to produce the website or do we have to switch to another program?
3 – Do we have to change the program?
4 – Can we continue to use Macintoshes or should we switch to Windows?
5 – What are the internal skills of the company needed to make the system work day after day?
6 – Who needs to know what to do?
7 – How long can a training course last?
8 – Who should participate?
9 – If I want to change a data entry screen, can I do it from within or do we have to make a request to you?
10 – How many days will it take to start and set up the program?
11 – Can we personally visit a company that has already adopted this system?
12 – Do you need a license?

Meeting styles tutorial Reproduce through role-playing the progress of a possible meeting between team A (“managerialese-diminutive” sales team composed of owner and shoulder) and team B (“concrete-pragmatic” purchasing team composed of owner and shoulder

Intercultural Negotiation Arab Edition

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

For further information see:

Code and Lines of Thought: a Two-Dimensional

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

First Component: the Communication Code

Culture is considered in this method as a set of patterns of thought, categorization, behavior and communication, which are both learned (during the individual’s growth) and inherited (the result of the genetic behavioral code). These patterns influence world perception, communication and behavior. Furthermore, following the theoretical perspective of Watzlawick and others, communication is considered as a process that occurs both intentionally and involuntarily, at any moment the behavior occurs in the presence of others.

From a semiotic perspective, the fundamental unit of analysis and the first component of communication perceived during interaction is the sign, the largest inclusive category of entities of meaning. Signs are what we emit, and they constitute the external communicative behavior perceived by a receiver or observer. Therefore, verbal behaviors, non-verbal behaviors (imagine for example the body posture we assume in front of an interlocutor, and its unspoken meanings), written communication, symbols, images we use to communicate are signs. The signs (used to communicate) and the meaning of the communication are linked by a communication code, which in turn is made up of subcodes.

A communication code is therefore intended as a system of rules used to connect expressions (any sign used to communicate, both verbal and non-verbal) to the underlying meanings. Awareness of the multiple codes of communication is essential for communication quality. Every conscious communicator / negotiator knows that his or her body emits signals all the time, and that these signals can be inconsistent or congruent with verbal signals (words or phrases spoken). We can say – in words – to be serene, but transmit with the body the feeling of being tense and nervous, and our interlocutors will notice it .. We can verbally express pleasure and unconsciously transmit repulsion.

The problem of communication codes is above all a problem of communication style, which requires the choice of the type of language to be used. What style, what language do we use to express the message? Let’s use a metaphor on the styles of sexual communication: … we currently know four different languages ​​in sexuality, each of which gives a completely different imprint to the same situation.

For example, if she wants to be penetrated, a woman may ask:

  • “Insert the penis into the vagina” (technical language);
  • “I would like to feel you inside me, to see the stars” (romantic language);
  • “Fuck me and make me enjoy” (pornographic language);
  • “With the jade staff open my lotus flower” (poetic language).

Every negotiator, every communicator, consciously or not, uses a linguistic style. Style can be seen in every phase of speech and conversation, in every written communication and even in physical media (materials, objects).

A negotiator can open the conversation with a business interlocutor by stating:

  • «We are here to evaluate how it is possible to build a project together» (cooperative language);
  • “It is necessary to evaluate the feasibility and the possible break-even point of one of our joint ventures” (English-speaking managerial language);
  • “Ok, we’re here, now let’s cut it short, tell me your conditions and hurry up, I don’t have time to waste” (aggressive language);
  • “Let’s try to explore our common horizons and see if a dawn can rise between us, I hope not a sunset” (poetic-ironic language).

Awareness of the codes and styles used is essential, since codes and styles can be antithetical or similar, functional or dysfunctional with respect to the objectives.

Intercultural Negotiation Arab Edition

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

For further information see:

Psychological and Communicative Distances

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

Differences Between Sender and Recipient of Messages

The T2V method developed by the author addresses the problem of the “distances” that separate communicators – psychological and communicative distances, certainly not physical – and how these can or cannot be overcome. Feeling the “distance” between people is a common, daily fact. Feeling distant even when you are physically close, looking for a contact and not finding it, not understanding the approaching moves of others, the desires of a deeper relationship, or the signals that others send us.

It is a common aspect of life. We can, however, and this is the interesting game – try to reduce these distances, if and when we desire it inwardly – in the case of friendships and intimate relationships. In these cases, or when it is important in terms of business, it is possible to put in place devices that allow us to seek the approach, reduce the distance and remove misunderstanding. Among the main errors of communication is that of deluding oneself that people are all in all similar in terms of opinions, languages, attitudes, basic values, world views.

This presumption leads us to consider the transmission of an idea or concept that we consider obvious and simple, an almost “automatic” fact, while in reality this is not the case. A further illusion is that intercultural communication requires little effort or commitment. Some think of resolving relationships with wives, husbands, children, colleagues by talking on a cell phone for a few minutes. Even if it were hours, the communicative quality will still remain unsuitable for the problem. True intercultural negotiation requires time, commitment, dedication, interpersonal contacts and extensive “relationship work” that doesn’t end with an email or a phone call.

If we want to be effective on an intercultural level, we must use the right time and the right means of contact. Personal critical incidents analysis tutorial Critical incidents (critical cases, positive or negative) are extremely helpful in discovering some relationship mechanisms that do not work, or behaviors and attitudes that create difficulties in relationships and negotiations.

Analyzing some critical personal relationship incidents (critical, positive or negative events), in which we can assess that not enough time has been spent working on the relationship, clarifying differences, or the most effective means of contact have not been used from us or from others. Highlight:

  • times (when);
  • people involved (who);
  • reasons for the criticality (why);
  • possible alternative lines of action to be taken in similar cases.

Differences between sender and recipient of messages

One of the main areas of intercultural communication is the study of the differences between the sender and receiver of the message. How are “I” and “you” different? In relations between companies, where are the differences between “us” and “you”? In our method we will use two primary variables that constitute differences between communicators – two main cultural differences, (1) the communication code and (2) the world-view. The union of the two variables will allow us to develop a matrix of communication situations or states (COMSITS).

From the analysis of the matrix, we will propose some considerations on the limits of communication. In particular, the implications concern:

  • (1) the technical aspect of the communicative quality, that is, the exactness or accuracy of the exchange of information between people of different cultures (understanding), and
  • (2) the result of the communication in terms of agreement on the contents and visions expressed between the communicators. The two-dimensional model will be further developed in a forthcoming publication through the introduction of the four-variable model (T4V).
Intercultural Negotiation Arab Edition

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

For further information see:

Barriers to Communicability, Linguistic Microdiversity, Macrodiversity, Semantic Fields

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

Some Linguistic Problems

In the previous paragraph, we began to mention the problem of the different conception of the world produced by cultural diversity. But the problems don’t stop there. In fact, in intercultural communication we find a further barrier, generally much more evident: a different language, a different language, an uncommon communication code, unknown sub-codes (dialects, professional languages).

It is enough to hear two astronomers or two physicists talking to each other, while dealing with their work problem, to feel completely alien after a few seconds, unable to mentally connect with what they are saying. Also in this case we must consider an important phenomenon: linguistic diversity can be evident (macrodiversity: eg, Chinese vs. Arabic), but also very subtle and difficult to recognize, creating situations of linguistic micro-diversity.

There are different professional languages ​​within the same language, and different meanings applied to the same words. The problem of communication is not limited to the translation between different languages, but also touches the flow of words that exist between father and son, who grew up in two different generations, with different models and languages, or between managers of different sectors, whose problems and languages ​​become separate worlds. Translating means carrying meanings into other languages, but also, and above all, allowing access to a different system of thought.

Let’s see the following case:

• for US Americans, “tomorrow” (in Italian) means from midnight to midnight;

• in Mexico, “mañana” (always “tomorrow” in Italian) means “in the future”, it has a general postponement sense, and absolutely does not include a precise time frame.

The two different conceptions are not purely linguistic, but refer to a different perception of time. A seemingly trivial act, such as writing a date, can cause misunderstandings and problems, e.g .: 05.02.2010 means February 5, 2010 in many European countries that adopt the day / month / year date format, but it means April 5, 2010 in the USA and in other systems that conventionally adopt the month / day / year format. When two generations or two religions dialogue with each other, the problem of cultural interpretation arises seriously. This problem also arises in the dialogue between two companies, regardless of the language used.

One of the most naïve mistakes of those who face the intercultural dimension is the presumption that it is possible to translate the meanings exactly, transposing verbs and words “as they are” and simply bringing them into the language of others. Translation is actually a much more complex phenomenon. Each word, each verb, has specific “semantic fields” (fields of meaning) that cannot be translated exactly into the language of others. In some cases, there are no translation possibilities – in many cases, words and verbs have no exact correspondence in each other’s cultures and languages. Let’s see an example. An Italian company is preparing to start a production activity in China. He is looking for on-site consultancy to train managers on the issues of quality-oriented leadership, commitment to corporate values ​​(commitment), good internal communication.

It is therefore looking for trainers in communication. But how will you describe your need when the category of “trainers in communication” is not linguistically consolidated in the Chinese language? And are we sure that – if there is a similar term – the mental image that in Italy corresponds to the “trainer” is the same in the mind of the Chinese recipient? Thinking that the mental images between two subjects can match perfectly is a pure illusion. There are also intercultural problems when it comes to communication between the sexes.

If we only reflect on how much diversity exists between a Latin man and a woman on the concept of “having a relationship”, or “making love”, and other similar concepts, we can understand that the intercultural dimension is present in every moment of the day. But let’s go back to our Italian-Chinese dimension. What form of communication are we talking about? In Chinese there are at least two terms (ideograms) to describe “communication”, and at least three words that can vaguely approach the meaning of the term “trainer”. Are we sure we can translate correctly or that the translator does it? Let’s see some of these meanings in the following comparative table.

TermsIdeogramsPing YinMeanings
Communication沟通gou tongunderstand each other well between the parties
Communication传播chuan bomake yourself understood and spread your ideas
Trainer训练员xun lian yuanwho helps to do exercises
Coach培训pei xuna growth guide that takes care of both aspects of skill and motivation
Coach-Mentor导师dao shispiritual guide – who lights the way – who assists you in your growth (ex: study mentor, religious guide, teacher)

Even very similar languages ​​(Italian and Spanish) can give rise to translation problems, sometimes due to the similarity of the sound or the word. The word “embarrassed” in Italian has a meaning (roughly, to be uncomfortable), while in Spanish the word “embarazada” means to be pregnant. The same similarity in the root of the word generates problems in the American speaker who relates to a Spanish speaker by saying “I am embarrassed” (I am embarrassed), which can be decoded as “I am pregnant”.

The intercultural problem does not start only from the kilometer distance, but can occur within a few meters. Each dialect is full of words that cannot be translated into the official language. For example, the Ferrara dialect – like any dialect – uses terms that cannot be translated literally into the Italian language:

Tab. 2 – Some correspondences and problems of exact untranslatability from dialect (Ferrara) to Italian

TermsRough explanationTranslations into English possibleProblems of semantics
CioccapiattSomeone who “locks the plates”, who makes plates bang
The cioccapiatt highlights the person who makes a lot of noise but does not produce concreteness, someone who talks a lot but does not, but also someone who claims to have done or to do, but then will not.
Talker, braggartChiacchierone does not contain the semantic dimension of stealth, of boasting, which “cioccapiatt” instead possesses
Millantatore is very negatively connoted in Italian, but the “cioccapiatt” in Ferrara is only vaguely offensive, it is often a joking term.
PuffarolSomeone who “makes puffs”. Puffs are scams, escapes, broken promisesScammer, “crook”The puffarol makes scams, yes, but not graphs, it can do at most little damage
TrabascanShady person, someone who has “shady turns”Crook, shadyThe Trabascan is much more negative than the Puffarol, it can also be criminal, while the Puffarol generally does not do serious damage, but is limited to “throwing bins”

Exercises on untranslatability Exercise: search for words within their own dialects (if known), which may be difficult to translate into the Italian language. Evaluate the problems and difficulties of a precise translation, using the example of the table above. Exercise: search for words within your own language that may be difficult to translate into another known language. Evaluate the problems and difficulties of a precise linguistic translation, and the alternatives to effectively transfer the meaning. Exercise: researching technical terms within your profession, selecting above all the terms that should be explained to new customers, and the terms that we cannot take for granted or simplistically translate into a different language. Above all, select the terms that require the client’s “acculturation”.

Intercultural Negotiation Arab Edition

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

For further information see:

Communication Barriers, Psychological Distances, Misunderstanding and Disagreement – T2V model (Trevisani 2 Variabili)

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

Language Barriers and Cultural Barriers

One of the first discoveries of those who venture outside their own cultural contexts is that the behavioral rules that work in their own culture prove to be fragile and not very productive when transposed into a foreign context. Let’s see some short examples:  In your home: for a while you have wanted to discuss a topic with a family member, but every time you try it, the person escapes.

What is happening?

  • In your country: a customer would like to buy (a project, a product) but you know that the purchase is underpowered, the problem he would like to solve is big and the budget is not enough to give him a real result, how do you manage to make it understood?
  • Beijing. 9.30 am, Sheraton Hotel. The client company’s delegation has not yet arrived, the appointment was at 9.15 am. Can we interpret it as a tactical move, or a real delay? Did they want to delay, or did something happen?
  • Moscow. We offer the counterpart the exclusivity of our product on Soviet territory, the additional benefit of training the staff of their entire sales network, but the counterpart is offended and closes the negotiations. What happened?
  • Buenos Aires. The negotiations to access the contracts of the ministry of industry are endless, incomprehensible, obscure. How to behave?
  • Jerusalem. Representatives of the Jewish, Catholic and Muslim cults, ministers and political representatives meet to negotiate a possible peace, you are called to lead the debate, how to avoid a conflict?
  • Budapest. The plant management fails to break down production defects, any attempt to intervene in depth is in vain. What to do? In each example situation exposed, we are faced with the problem of intercultural negotiation. The intercultural negotiation capacity is in the hands of those who are most skilled in managing communication in the field, applying cultural awareness (power of awareness) in every single contact.

But let’s see some other situations.

  • Bologna, beginning of the third millennium: a nine-year-old boy no longer wants to go to the football school he has been attending for two years, he prefers to play with his friends on the pitch, and he doesn’t want to hear more about football and league school. Why?
  • Munich: a 30-year-old husband, freelance, argues with his wife (same age) because he wants to have children only when they have a solid economic base, while his wife wants to have them soon. What’s up?
  • Your home: you wake up in the morning and you know you had a dream that hit you but you can’t remember the details. What happened?
  • In your office or company: with a colleague you have not been able to understand each other for a long time, you seem to speak two different languages, the more you try and the more you do not understand each other, you begin to be really tired of the situation. What is actually happening? In all these cases the intercultural dimension enters – at various stages.

A common denominator unites all these cases: language barriers are nothing compared to the different vision of the world that people bring with them, and to the differences that exist between themselves and others, despite appearances. We do not want to reveal or propose easy or immediate solutions for all these different cases (at most, we can propose hypotheses), but we want to give only a clue on the case that is certainly more strange and difficult to frame as intercultural communication: the memory of a dream.

Well, as various researches in the field show, even the dialogue within the same person (interior dialogue) takes on features of intercultural dialogue. When different states of consciousness have difficulty in communicating with each other, eg: the rational state of wakefulness versus the unconscious and subconscious state of sleep, internal incommunicability occurs.

These states are dominated by extremely different logics, and they manage to find moments of commonality only on rare occasions (such as in border states, of semi-sleep, the moments in which neither of them manages to dominate the other). Even on an inner level, therefore, we find symptoms of a condition of intercultural dialogue. Comparison exercise and search for alternative explanations. Attempt, in small groups, to give answers to the questions posed by the cases highlighted above.

Try to highlight

  • alternative hypotheses or alternative explanations;
  • the different hypotheses on the ground;
  • think about the probabilities that our explanations are really the causes of the investigated phenomena;
  • search for one’s own evaluative rigidity, the hypotheses that start from stereotypes or unverified beliefs.
Intercultural Negotiation Arab Edition

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

For further information see:

intercultural negotiation working communication

Consonances and Dissonances Between Linguistic and Non-Verbal Styles

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

Negative Non-Verbal Signals from the Interlocutor (Tension, Disinterest)

Non-verbal communication can reinforce the verbal message or be dissonant with it. Listening carefully and nodding can signal interest much more than just a verbal statement. Saying “I am interested” with words and expressing boredom or disgust with body actions produces a dissonant signal and creates suspicion or irritation. The coherence (matching) between words and actions:

  • increases the perceived honesty of the subject;
  • denotes trustworthiness;
  • shows interest;
  • shows that we are in control of the situation;
  • produces a sense of security and solidity of the contents.
    On the contrary, the incongruity:
  • creates a sense of distrust;
  • generates feelings of lack of authenticity;
  • produces doubts and suspicions of falsehood on the verbal contents heard.

Each linguistic style (on an interpersonal level) is associated with a precise modulation of the non-verbal style. We can in fact have:

  • situations of communicative reinforcement (the non-verbal style reinforces the verbal style);
  • situations of dissonance or inconsistency between verbal and non-verbal: non-verbal communication proceeds on a different register than verbal communication).

The dissonances concern every semiotic system, every sign carrying possible meanings. A company that declares itself important and does not have a website, or has an amateur site, expresses an image dissonance, just as a negotiator forgets to bring essential tools with him (catalogs, calculators, and any other necessary and expected tool ).

Non-verbal signals may indicate that the interlocutor is following the dialogue with a positive or negative attitude. Negative reactions in general are denoted by:

  • angulations of the body: shoulders retracted, distancing;
  • face: tense, shows anger;
  • voice: negative tone, sudden silences;
  • hands: movements of refusal or disapproval, tense movements;
  • arms: straight, crossed on the chest;
  • legs: crossed or moving away at an angle.

Exercises of consonance and dissonance between verbal styles and non-verbal communication styles. Initiate a dialogue on a random theme (e.g. where it is more pleasant to take holidays) and express – only through body postures – the following meanings:

  • I can’t stand you, you give me physical annoyance;
  • you are nice;  my head is elsewhere, I find it hard to follow you, I am distracted;
  • I have doubts about your honesty.
    Second phase of the exercise. Let’s now modulate the styles, introducing some variations:
  • verbal expression: saying “I can’t stand you, you give me physical annoyance”, with non-verbal reinforcement (eg: grinding your teeth, clenching your fists);
  • verbal expression: “I can’t stand you, you give me physical annoyance”, with non-verbal dissonance (eg: smiling amiably).
    Following the scheme shown:
  • Verbal expression: “you are nice”, with non-verbal reinforcement;
  • verbal expression: “you are nice”, with dissonance in the non-verbal;
  • verbal expression “I have my head elsewhere, I find it difficult to follow you, I am distracted”, with non-verbal reinforcement;
  • verbal expression “I have my head elsewhere, I find it hard to follow you, I am distracted”, with non-verbal dissonance;
  • verbal expression “I have doubts about your honesty”, with non-verbal reinforcement;
  • verbal expression “I have doubts about your honesty”, with dissonance in the non-verbal.
Intercultural Negotiation Arab Edition

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

For further information see:

intercultural negotiation working communication

Variance of Colors Between Cultures, Variance in the Meaning of Gifts

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

And Use of Pre-Tests to Evaluate the Impact and Satisfaction

A further element of symbolic communication is given by the use of colors. The use of colors and the symbolisms associated with colors also vary according to cultures. Let’s see some cases: while in most Western and Arab countries the color white is synonymous with purity, in Japan and other Asian countries white is the color of death and mourning.

Yellow is associated in Western countries with signs of attention, while in China it represents wealth and authority. Purple represents in Latin America a funeral color (death) while in Europe it is associated with royalty, with the precious velvets of the courts. It is not possible in this volume to deal with a scale of associations for each color in each nation, but we underline the need to pay attention to the symbolisms associated with colors, whenever problems arise in the choice of colors and graphics, for example in packaging, gifts. of representation, in objects.

Blue is among the “safest” colors on a cultural level, but practically all colors take on some particular meanings in some countries, such as red, the color of the celebration in China, used in events such as parties, weddings or funerals, orange which in Ireland is the symbol of the Protestant religion, or the color Saffron (light orange tending to peach), sacred color of the Hindu religion.

Even the objects and symbols are not neutral. An Italian company used hand symbols (e.g. an open hand) to create company logos and key rings, producing a wave of protests from Greece (where the open hand symbol is used to offend), while still in other countries of the ‘Latin America retailers refused to display packages containing “ok” symbols in stores because they were considered offensive.

The basic principle to avoid macroscopic errors is the use of the pre-test, the “pilot test” on some subjects, small samples, representative people of the local culture who are able to give feedback on the appropriateness of colors, shapes and symbolisms , of messages, seen from within the culture itself. The pre-test method also applies to the choice of gifts, presents, and any other symbolic action whose impact may vary on a cultural basis.

Intercultural Negotiation Arab Edition

© Article translated from the book “Negoziazione interculturale, comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali” (Intercultural Negotiation: Communication Beyond Cultural Barriers) copyright Dr. Daniele Trevisani Intercultural Negotiation Training and Coaching, published with the author’s permission. The Book’s rights are on sale and are available for any Publisher wishing to consider it for publication in English and other languages except for Italian and Arab whose rights are already sold and published. If you are interested in publishing the book in English, or any other language, or seek Intercultural Negotiation Training, Coaching, Mentoring and Consulting, please feel free to contact the author from the webstite www.danieletrevisani.com 

For further information see:

Dare il meglio di sé

Dare il meglio di sé

Articolo estratto dal testo “Il potenziale umano – Metodi e tecniche di coaching e training per lo sviluppo delle performance” Copyright FrancoAngeli e dott. Daniele Trevisani.

Chi si occupa di potenziale umano e di performance con fini professionali ha in mente sicuramente traguardi veri e forti di miglioramento, per sé e gli altri. Se così non fosse saremmo veramente fuori strada. Chi svolge questo tipo di missione con fare burocratico o apatico ne stravolge realmente il senso.

Ne deforma il senso anche chi confonde le performance di superficie (più eclatanti ed evidenti) con le performance profonde (crescita personale, evoluzione spirituale), e investe solo sule prime e poco sulle ultime.

Facciamo un esempio pratico rispetto al coaching educativo e al ruolo di un learning coach. Far sì che un ragazzo/a dia il meglio di sé nella scuola o università è il motore morale corretto, e soprattutto che trovi equilibrio tra studio e attività fisica, senza scompensi che lo danneggino nel lungo termine. Essere i primi della classe ma non amare lo studio è pura distorsione.

Le società iper-competitive che premiano solo chi arriva in alto, chi primeggia, i vincenti forzati , creano mostri. Confondono il contributo con la posizione. La domanda che qualcuno, al termine dei nostri giorni, dovrebbe porci, non è “dove sei arrivato”, ma “a cosa hai contribuito veramente”?

Questo è un nuovo metro di misura da adottare. Per un manager, per un trainer, per un politico, per un ricercatore, e per ogni essere vivente, vivere a pieno non significa “smarcare” le proprie giornate arrivando a sera in qualche modo. Significa assumersi in pieno il ruolo di “contributori”.

Dare il meglio di sé

Dare il meglio di sè non equivale a primeggiare. Significa invece essere parte di un ideale, e concretizzarlo in piccoli cambiamenti di atteggiamento. 

Nello studio, non sarà il singolo voto a contare, ma l’avvio di un nuovo atteggiamento di amore verso lo studio o verso una materia. Sarà un nuovo senso di sfida positiva, o il piacere dell’apprendere, a dirci se siamo o meno sulla strada giusta. Ancora una volta: dare il meglio di sé non è studiare per il singolo voto ma studiare per apprendere. 

La pura performance (il voto), è secondaria, è una cartina di tornasole di cosa succede dentro, ma non è il dentro, e, addirittura, se fosse regalato o frutto di copiatura non ci direbbe niente sullo stato di avanzamento della persona. Proponiamo questa libera riflessione di Madre Teresa di Calcutta, come stimolo di riflessione, aperto sia a critiche che apprezzamenti:

Il meglio di te

L’uomo è irragionevole,
illogico, egocentrico:
non importa, amalo.


Se fai il bene,
diranno che lo fai
per secondi fini egoistici:
non importa, fa’ il bene.


Se realizzi i tuoi obiettivi,
incontrerai chi ti ostacola:
non importa, realizzali.


Il bene che fai
forse domani verrà dimenticato:
non importa, fa’ il bene.


L’onestà e la sincerità
ti rendono vulnerabile:
non importa, sii onesto e sincero.


Quello che hai costruito
può essere distrutto:
non importa, costruisci.


La gente che hai aiutato,
forse non te ne sarà grata:
non importa, aiutala.


Dà al mondo il meglio di te,
e forse sarai preso a pedate:
non importa, dà il meglio di te.

Queste parole non sono vuote, possono essere concretizzate.
Coach e formatori impegnati e seri lavorano per rendere concreta l’espressione di sé e dei potenziali. 

Un coaching analitico ricerca la crescita della persona e non la crescita di un lato della persona a scapito dell’equilibrio complessivo. Spremere un frutto e gettarlo non è il nostro fine. Il nostro fine è coltivare la pianta.

Dare il meglio non significa bruciare se stessi o gli altri, spremersi sino a distruggersi. Anche in un coaching sportivo vale lo stesso principio. Operare per rendere un atleta una persona d’onore, seria, impegnata, continuativa, deve essere il motore psicologico di un coach sportivo. Vincere una stagione e bruciarla per il resto della vita non è coaching, è uccidere la persona.

Lo stesso nel TeamCoaching. Fare di una squadra un gruppo con dei valori e degli ideali, un gruppo che quando va in campo dà il meglio di sé, un gruppo che vuole esprimersi ed essere sempre orgoglioso di come ha giocato e dello spirito che ha, è lo scopo di uno team-coach

Stesso discorso sul piano aziendale. Un coach aziendale, un formatore o consulente serio, puntano alla realizzazione delle potenzialità (nel coaching manageriale). O, nel lavoro sulla leadership, avremo successo quando un leader smette di fingere a se stesso e agli altri, procede verso una direzione di autenticità e maturità prima di tutto come persona. 

Nella consulenza, avremo obiettivi diversi, come il trovare nuovi equilibri solidi, e non necessariamente aumenti di fatturato “di facciata”, se possono nascondere drammatiche crisi di solidità aziendale vera. 

Ed ancora, un formatore aziendale non è felice solo per come finisce la giornata formativa, ma per lo spirito che lo anima, e con cui entra: si entra nell’aula con anima combattiva (o missionaria), voglia di incidere, creare pensiero e crescita. Questo significa aiutare il gruppo che ha davanti a sè a riflettere su come pensa e come lavora, fargli fare esperienze impattanti ma soprattutto utili, portargli stimoli e concetti che allargheranno il loro patrimonio professionale o ne rimuovano incrostazioni. 

Un trainer serio non si accontenta di “smarcare” una giornata, dire o fare qualsiasi cosa faccia divertire il pubblico e gli dia punteggi elevati sulle “valutazioni” di fine corso. 

Per far emergere il meglio delle persone bisogna anche essere disposti ad andare controcorrente, a rischiare, a difendere un concetto in cui crede.

Un ulteriore commento: dare il meglio di sé è un atteggiamento che si può apprendere, è stimolabile e generabile tramite un buon modeling, e fare da esempio agli altri, ove possibile, è una nostra precisa responsabilità.

Per approfondimenti vedi:

Cristina Turconi
Executive & Business Coach ICF | Formatrice Aziendale | Facilitatrice Lavoro di Gruppo | Master Practitioner in HPM™ Human Potential Modeling | Consulente e Innovation Manager MISE 

Sito Cristina Turconi – Sviluppo del Potenziale Individuale, dei Team e delle Imprese
Cristina Turconi – Blog WordPress
Cristina Turconi – Linkedin
Cristina Turconi – Facebook

Temi e keywords per l’articolo sono:

  • Che vuol dire crescita?
  • Come avere una crescita personale?
  • Come fare un piano di sviluppo personale?
  • Cosa vuol dire crescita personale?
  • crescita personale blog
  • crescita personale corsi
  • crescita personale da dove iniziare
  • crescita personale frasi
  • crescita personale libri
  • crescita personale podcast
  • crescita personale psicologia
  • crescita personale sinonimo
  • esempio piano di sviluppo personale
  • miglioramento personale
  • percorso di crescita personale
  • sviluppo personale app
  • sviluppo personale libri
  • sviluppo personale significato

Il Processo Creativo a Colori: Approcci alla creatività e al Problem Solving nei Team

Il Processo Creativo a Colori: approcci alla creatività e al Problem Solving nei Team

Progetto a cura di: Cristina Turconi – Executive & Business Coach ICF | Formatrice Aziendale | Facilitatrice Lavoro di Gruppo | Master Practitioner in HPM™ Human Potential Modeling | Consulente e Innovation Manager MISE | Consulente e Facilitatrice Certificata Metodo 4Colors®

Il detto: “L’unione fa la forza”, vale sempre di più all’interno di un processo creativo, dove ogni energia colore del Metodo 4Colors® trova il suo posto.

La descrizione più nota del processo creativo è quella per “fasi successive”, proposta dallo psicologo ed educatore inglese Graham Wallas con Richard Smith, autori del testo The art of thought, pubblicato nel 1926 [1]. Diversi autori in tempi più recenti hanno approfondito i quattro stadi di Wallas, suddividendoli in altri autonomi momenti.
In questo quadro rientra anche Hubert Jaouil, per il quale la creazione e si configura in un processo con 5 tappe.

Nel colorato gioco della creatività, Vediamo come queste 5 tappe si intersecano con le 4 energie colore rappresentate nella bussola 4Colors® in questa successione [2]:

Il Processo Creativo a Colori: 
Approcci alla creatività e al Problem Solving nei Team
Processus Creatif + Couleurs – Know Future 4Colors Blog [3]

Fase 0 – Il LANCIO dell’idea (energia rossa):

E’ il momento in cui emerge un’intenzione, un desiderio, un’aspettativa, ma anche un bisogno o la necessità di risolvere un problema. È quella “sensazione” che necessita di essere in qualche modo esplorata, che sente l’esigenza di incarnarsi in un progetto o in qualcosa di più strutturato. In questa fase emerge forte il desiderio di andare oltre, con una reale volontà di fare le cose. Questo è il lancio dell’idea.

Affinché questo momento sia un vero innesco, è necessario mettere in atto un’energia proattiva, “go-ahead”, volontaristica, caratteristica dei dominanti ROSSI del DISC.
Per esempio, quando si crea un webinar online sul cambiamento, all’inizio, una persona lancerà l’idea, la visione di fare questo webinar.

Fase 1 – La PREPARAZIONE (energia giallo-blu):

Poi, il desiderio deve essere trasmesso alla squadra, sottoposto all’intelligenza collettiva del gruppo. Serve instillare, mantenere o far crescere il desiderio nel gruppo del piacere di trasformare la visione iniziale in un passo più concreto. È infatti l’energia GIALLA del DISC degli “Influencer,” rivolta all’azione nella relazione, che viene messa in atto. Qui serve trasformare i dubbi e le perplessità in curiosità ed entusiasmo per “il nuovo” che si prospetta all’orizzonte.

Ora, questa fase di preparazione richiede di “far quadrare” l’energia gialla messa in moto (che ha una tendenza naturale a disperdersi). È in questo momento che i dominanti BLU del DISC, riflessivi, rigorosi, e strategici, entrano in gioco. Questa energia blu permette di analizzare l’origine della situazione, il problema iniziale per capirne le cause, ma anche di verificare in dettaglio la visione, l’obiettivo e le poste in gioco associate. Viene quindi avviata una ricerca, una fase di consultazione e ordinamento delle informazioni fino ad “aver assorbito” tutto quanto disponibile e necessario per questo progetto.

Tornando all’esempio della creazione di un webinar, si potrebbe ricorrere a una fase di brainstorming collettivo o all’utilizzo di tecniche creative per fare emergere idee innovative; allo stesso tempo verificare in dettaglio i temi da trattare e le informazioni da trasmettere. Approfondire gli aspetti tecnici e finanziari. Analizzare cosa è già disponibile sul mercato e cosa manca, intervistare le persone che potrebbero partecipare all’esperienza per far emergere bisogni, desideri e aspettative da soddisfare.

Il Processo Creativo a Colori: 
Approcci alla creatività e al Problem Solving nei Team

Fase 2 – L’INCUBAZIONE (energia verde):

Dopo questa fase piena di idee, ricerche, verifiche e relazioni, arriva il tempo della riflessione per lasciare spazio all’inconscio, all’l’incubazione. Questo momento è più calmo, meno controllato: si tratta di uno spazio dove lasciar calmierare le energie messe in moto e lasciar sedimentare quanto emerso. In questa fase ogni inventore cova ed elabora le sue idee, essa può avere una durata variabile, anche lunga; di questo particolare momento è molto interessante l’aspetto di elaborazione inconscia, nella quale i meccanismi di assemblaggio operano ad insaputa dell’inventore.

L’incubazione mette dunque in primo piano l’energia VERDE del DISC: il fare un passo indietro, l’invitare la calma e la riflessione. Non fare nulla fisicamente non significa che non avvenga alcuna trasformazione all’interno. Al contrario, si tratta di fidarsi della propria intuizione, di questo sesto senso e lasciare che le idee vengano a galla, con pazienza e umiltà. 

Nell’esempio della creazione del webinar, è la fase del “mettersi in stand-by”, dove è necessario darsi il tempo di tenere metaforicamente “nel retro della mente” l’obiettivo della sua creazione. Aprire la mente ad altre pratiche artistiche, culturali, sportive e contemplative. E’ una scommessa di maturazione che donerà più ampiezza alla materia.

Fase 3 – L’ILLUMINAZIONE (energia gialla):

Questo è il momento del famoso: “Eureka!” di Archimede [4]. L’illuminazione: “E’ la più commovente”, è il passaggio dall’oscurità all’improvvisa apparizione della soluzione “con una chiarezza impressionante che può abbagliarlo”. Jaoui distingue un’illuminazione di tipo endogeno da quella che viene provocata da un avvenimento esterno, “come la mela di Newton o la marmitta di Denis Papin”, in ogni caso l’illuminazione è favorita nelle “menti preparate” [5].

L’illuminazione avviene in un istante, inaspettato, spontaneo, insomma: un momento di follia gialla, dove la gioia esulta; i 5 sensi sono in subbuglio. La rivelazione esplode nella testa, l’idea improvvisamene illumina la mente. L’energia gioiosa GIALLA del DISC esulta. I legami si intrecciano immediatamente con tutte le idee, le ricerche e gli scambi precedenti: tutto si connette perfettamente. “Il taglio del webinar” diventa lapalissiano; così come le sue peculiarità, il valore aggiunto del suo contenuto e il titolo accattivante spontaneamente emergono.

Fase 4 – La VERIFICA (energia blu-rossa):

Questa fase chiude il circolo del processo creativo: “la verità può essere ingannevole, le soluzioni apparentemente più geniali possono avere un vizio nascosto”; questa è la fase dove con l’aiuto di esperti o anche con un confronto con il pubblico o con il cliente,  si verifica la soluzione innovatrice e il tipo di risultato che andrà a produrre [6].

E’ la fase di attuazione di tutte le idee innovative.
A nord della bussola dei colori si procede mettendo le cose in chiaro.  Si tratta di pianificare, monitorare i progressi, controllare i dettagli con l’energia BLU del DISC.

E poi serve un capitano ROSSO del DISC che si assicuri che la rotta sia impostata nella direzione della visione e spinga i marinai del suo Team ad attraversare “la tempesta del cambiamento” per realizzare l’idea e ottenere il meritato successo. Nell’esempio del webinar, si mette fattivamente in moto la “macchina organizzativa”: l’evento viene lanciato, vengono condivisi compiti e attività, si eseguono i passi necessari, si fanno i controlli tecnici e il webinar finalmente è pronto.

Le menti più pure e più pensose
sono quelle che amano i colori.

– john ruski –

Questa è una chiara metodologia operativa della creatività, un percorso colorato che utilizza un enorme quantità di risorse che sono presenti all’interno dei gruppi di lavoro e in ciascuno di noi, indipendentemente dal nostro temperamento e dalle nostre attitudini.

Saper mescolare sapientemente queste 4 energie colore all’interno di ogni gruppo di lavoro permette di liberare la creatività e dipingere capolavori.

[1] Wallas G., The Art of Thought. New York, Harcourt, Brace, 1926. In Arieti S., Creatività. La sintesi magica, Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore, Roma, 1979, p. 15.

[2] Puoi approfondire le 4 energie colore e la Bussola 4Colors® a questo articolo.

[3] Articolo: Processus Creatif + Couleurs = La marelle de la creativité – 31 mars 2020 – Vianney Boussuat – Blog 4Colors.

[4] Eureka – Wikipedia.

[5] Jaoui H., Creatività per tutti. Strumenti e metodi da impiegare nel quotidiano, Milano, Franco Angeli, 1993, p. 30.

[6] Articolo: Fasi del Processo creativo di Daniele Brambilla – nume.it.

Progetto a cura di:

Cristina Turconi
Executive & Business Coach ICF | Formatrice Aziendale | Facilitatrice Lavoro di Gruppo | Master Practitioner in HPM™ Human Potential Modeling | Consulente e Innovation Manager MISE | Consulente e Facilitatrice Certificata Metodo 4Colors®

Sito Cristina Turconi – Sviluppo del Potenziale Individuale, dei Team e delle Imprese
Cristina Turconi – Blog WordPress
Cristina Turconi – Linkedin
Cristina Turconi – Facebook

Temi e keywords per l’articolo sono:

  • 4 Colori
  • A cosa serve la formazione aziendale?
  • Carattere e comportamento
  • Carattere personalità esempi
  • Carattere tipi
  • Che cosa si intende per comunicare
  • Colori
  • Come si fa un piano di formazione?
  • Comunicazione
  • Comunicazione Aziendale
  • Cosa ci si aspetta da un corso di formazione?
  • Cos’è la personalità
  • Cosa vuol dire formazione
  • Disc
  • Disc italiano
  • Facilitazione
  • Facilitazione lavoro di gruppo
  • Formazione
  • Formazione aziendale
  • Formazione team
  • Gruppo
  • Gruppo di lavoro
  • I 4 colori della personalità
  • La teoria dei 4 colori della personalità
  • Lavoro di gruppo
  • Lavoro di squadra
  • Lavoro in team
  • Metodo 4Colors®
  • Modello Disc
  • Personalità
  • Personalità e carattere
  • Personalità sinonimo
  • Personalità test
  • Squadra
  • Team
  • Teorema dei 4 colori
  • Test 4Colors®
  • Test Disc
  • Tratti di personalità definizione
Energie mentali e umore, le nuove competenze (mood awareness, mood labeling, mood monitoring, cognitive la-beling)

Energie mentali e umore, le nuove competenze (mood awareness, mood labeling, mood monitoring, cognitive la-beling)

Articolo estratto dal testo “Il potenziale umano – Metodi e tecniche di coaching e training per lo sviluppo delle performance” Copyright FrancoAngeli e dott. Daniele Trevisani.

Bisognerebbe tentare di essere felici, non fosse altro per dare l’esempio.

Jacques Prévert

L’umore è uno degli elementi più esplicitamente correlati alle energie mentali, e dalle forti capacità “contagiose”, in bene e in male. Un umore è una condizione emotiva di maggiore durata rispetto al­l’emozione istantanea, e meno collegata ad un singolo evento scatenante.

I tipi di personalità sono invece tratti più duraturi che predispongono a tipi di umore specifici. Lottare contro l’eredità umorale appresa è una sfida nobile.

Secondo Thayer, l’umore è un prodotto di due dimensioni, l’energia e la tensione[1].
Gli umori positivi avvengono in zone di energie elevate e stato di calma, mentre ci sentiamo peggio quando siamo in condizione di basse energie fisiche accompagnate a tensione emotiva.

Bassi livelli di energie mentali sono in genere accompagnati da condizioni umorali negative, tristezza, depressione, mentre alti livelli sono accompagnati da stati positivi, dal rilassamento sino alla gioia e all’euforia.

Ciò che ci interessa maggiormente in termini di coaching analitico è il concetto di mood awareness[2], la consapevolezza dello stato umorale, una capacità specifica ed allenabile, composta da mood labeling (saper etichettare lo stato emotivo in corso) e mood monitoring (saper monitorare l’anda­mento del proprio umore, coscientemente, tener traccia delle variazioni). 

Energie mentali e umore, le nuove competenze (mood awareness, mood labeling, mood monitoring, cognitive la-beling)

Il labeling, in particolare, rappresenta il ponte essenziale tra il sentimento interno e la possibilità di comunicarlo. 

Comunicare ad altri come ci si sente è importantissimo, ed è tema di cui si occupano molte ricerche, che giungono a inquadrare il concetto di empatia interna[3], o la capacità di capirsi. Questa dipende anche dalla capacità di trovare etichette (verbali) per gli stati cognitivi e per i sentimenti vissuti. 

Conoscere i propri stati e non negarli è essenziale, ma poi serve la capacità di descriverli e – soprattutto –  l’occasione fisica, vera, di parlarne a qualcuno che ci ascolti.  Trovare oggi chi sia in grado da farci da contenitore emotivo è qualcosa di estremamente raro, ma non è su questo che mi voglio soffermare ora. Il fattore tecnico è che anche quando questa occasione di ascolto accade, non siamo sufficientemente capaci di esprimere i nostri veri sentimenti con precisione. Di questo ogni coach, leader o psicologo dovrebbe tenere conto.

Più in generale, la capacità di riuscire a dare nome e descrizione ai processi mentali in corso (cognitive labeling skills) permette di crescere psicologicamente. Infatti, non è per nulla scontato sapere come ci si sente, riuscire a riflettervi sopra analiticamente, o riuscire a comunicarlo, prima che gli umori diventino distruttivi. Molti subiscono lo stato umorale passivamente, o non riescono a condividerlo, o essere ascoltati, e in questo modo non arrivano a scardinare i meccanismi che lo generano, o replicare stati positivi.

Le energie mentali producono specifici stati umorali. Nella fig. 2 vediamo diverse tipologie.

Energie mentali e umore, le nuove competenze (mood awareness, mood labeling, mood monitoring, cognitive la-beling)
Grafico riprodotto con modifiche da: Dossier speciale a cura di Amelia Beltramini, in Focus, Aprile 2004.
Il grafico originario non presenta la riproduzione delle linee relative agli assi.

La domanda primaria rispetto allo schema evidenziato è “come ti senti?” L’attività di scavo deve riguardare invece il “perché ti senti così?”

All’interno delle risposte devono essere notati e scoperti i meccanismi di ragionamento che depotenziano e corrodono l’umore, le azioni e stili di vita che avvizziscono la persona, gli stili cognitivi disfunzionali, le aree su cui lavorare, e tutte le azioni invece positive da consolidare e rinforzare.

La psicoenergetica nel metodo HPM si occupa dei fattori psicologici che producono tali stati soggettivi o livelli di umore. In questo lavoro, non è possibile astenersi dal giudizio, non è possibile evitare di applicare valori e criteri di riferimento personali. 

In questo, il coaching differenzia sostanzialmente dalla psicoterapia non direttiva, in quanto arriva a dare giudizi di valore e indicare strade da perseguire.

Così come il grounding bioenergetico costituisce la base fisica su cui poggia la prestazione, il grounding psicoenergetico crea il fondamento delle energie psicologiche, dando corpo alla volontà, al senso di potercela fare, alla voglia di andare avanti. Ogni atto di volontà richiede una carica interiore.


[1] Thayer, R. E. (1989), The biopsychology of mood and arousal, Oxford University Press, New York, NY.,

R. E. (1996), The origin of everyday moods: Managing energy, tension and stress, Oxford University Press, New York, NY. 

Thayer, R. E. (2001), Calm Energy, Oxford University Press, New York, NY.

[2] Woodhouse, S. S., Gelso, C.J. (2008), Volunteer Client Adult Attachment, Memory for In-Session Emotion, and Mood Awareness: An Affect Regulation Perspective, Journal of Counseling Psychology, v. 55, n. 2, pp. 197-208, Apr.

[3] Jackson, E. (1986), Internal Empathy, Cognitive Labeling, and Demonstrated Empathy, Journal of Humanistic Education and Development, v. 24, n. 3, pp. 104-115, Mar.

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Cristina Turconi
Executive & Business Coach ICF | Formatrice Aziendale | Facilitatrice Lavoro di Gruppo | Master Practitioner in HPM™ Human Potential Modeling | Consulente e Innovation Manager MISE 

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